Northeast End of the Earth

It sounds like an overstatement until you arrive at Orient Point, Long Island, the breath-taking north-easternmost part of Southern New York. Orient Point is the last stop of the four-part Fall Outdoor Photo Trek class I teach. We’ll be touring the end of Long Island’s North Fork with its view of Plum Island and two lighthouses–the Plum Island Light built in 1869 and it’s fellow guardian across Plum Gut, the 1899-built Orient Point Light, a spark plug-style lighthouse affectionately called the Coffeepot Lighthouse. Sign up for more Outdoor Photo Treks, including Fall Foliage ones at East End Arts.

Map courtesy of https://maps-long-island.com/old-maps-of-long-island

The Infamous Cutchogue Sheep Stampede (well, not really).

September 7th’s Photo Safari–thanks to the North Shore Public Library in Shoreham–toured Peconic’s Catapano Dairy Farm, famous for goats, their milk and all manner of goat milk products, as well as 8 Hands Farm, a working farm in Cutchogue. Those eight hands belong to mom, dad, sis and 15-year-old Max, who showed us around. Lastly, we climbed to the top of Horton Point Lighthouse in Southold and got a green-fresnel-lens-view of the Long Island Sound.

History is in the Details

Carved in barnwood and later used in this interior renovation of an Eastern Long Island, NY farm was a simple inscription: R.E.T. 1903, with a flourish. It was the hand of the original owner, R.E. Tuttle (a.k.a. Tuthill), an early family name in this region.

Pictured is Jim Naples of East Bay Builders, Inc. From the available barnwood and original structures, Naples preserved and showcased so many of these details, preserving so much history.

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